Astroscale Japan Partners with JAXA to Launch Co-Creation Project for Satellite Refueling Service Concept

Astroscale Japan Partners with JAXA to Launch Co-Creation Project for Satellite Refueling Service Concept

Astroscale Japan, the market leader in satellite servicing and long-term orbital sustainability across all orbits, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) have started concept co-creation activities for a satellite refueling service, under the JAXA Space Innovation through Partnership and Co-creation (J-SPARC).

The aim is to explore concepts for a fuel delivery service for one year, toward the realization of space sustainability. The mission concept will be for providing refueling service on orbit to satellites that are both prepared and unprepared to be refueled.

“On-orbit services are the sustainable infrastructure of the space economy,” said Miki Ito, Managing Director of Astroscale Japan. “Over the past few years, awareness of the orbital environment and space sustainability has increased rapidly, and the demand for such services has grown significantly. We are pleased to be working with JAXA on refueling as a function of life extension, and by 2030, we plan to be able to make on-orbit services, including life extension, a routine basic infrastructure service.”

Astroscale Japan will study the feasibility of satellite refueling services and consider international collaboration with other Astroscale subsidiaries and partners, applying the rendezvous and proximity operations technology demonstrated in the End-of-Life Services by Astroscale – demonstration (ELSA-d) mission, and robot arm and hand technology currently under development to the refueling work. JAXA will study the technical feasibility of an on-orbit refueling system, examine ground test equipment for fuel transfer evaluation, and provide technical knowledge and advice based on the studies.

Earth’s orbits, particularly low-Earth orbit, are becoming crowded due to an increase in space activity, which has led to the accrual of orbital debris. If this trend continues without a solution, it will become difficult to safely use those orbits. To solve this problem and achieve a sustainable space environment, it is important to realize a circular economy through on-orbit services, which include removing and reducing space debris and reusing, repairing, and refueling spacecraft.

Refueling has cost-reducing effects for satellite operators. Extending the life of satellites will help reduce the number of satellites and launches required to carry out current space activities. Life extension also enables additional missions by removing fuel constraints. According to Northern Sky Research, a U.S. space market research firm, it is estimated that by 2031, life extension services such as refueling will generate $4.7 billion in revenue.

“On-orbit satellite refueling is a new service that overcomes the longevity factor of fuel depletion and enables satellite operations to continue for a longer period of time,” said Hiroyuki Sugita, Director of Research Unit II at JAXA’s Research and Development Directorate. “We expect that providing JAXA’s knowledge of refueling technology will advance the private sector’s space projects and contribute to the realization of sustainable space activities.”

Click here to learn more about JAXA Space Innovation through Partnership and Co-creation (J-SPARC).

Publisher: SatNow
Tags:-  SatelliteGround

GNSS Constellations - A list of all GNSS satellites by constellations

beidou

Satellite NameOrbit Date
BeiDou-3 G4Geostationary Orbit (GEO)17 May, 2023
BeiDou-3 G2Geostationary Orbit (GEO)09 Mar, 2020
Compass-IGSO7Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO)09 Feb, 2020
BeiDou-3 M19Medium Earth Orbit (MEO)16 Dec, 2019
BeiDou-3 M20Medium Earth Orbit (MEO)16 Dec, 2019
BeiDou-3 M21Medium Earth Orbit (MEO)23 Nov, 2019
BeiDou-3 M22Medium Earth Orbit (MEO)23 Nov, 2019
BeiDou-3 I3Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO)04 Nov, 2019
BeiDou-3 M23Medium Earth Orbit (MEO)22 Sep, 2019
BeiDou-3 M24Medium Earth Orbit (MEO)22 Sep, 2019

galileo

Satellite NameOrbit Date
GSAT0223MEO - Near-Circular05 Dec, 2021
GSAT0224MEO - Near-Circular05 Dec, 2021
GSAT0219MEO - Near-Circular25 Jul, 2018
GSAT0220MEO - Near-Circular25 Jul, 2018
GSAT0221MEO - Near-Circular25 Jul, 2018
GSAT0222MEO - Near-Circular25 Jul, 2018
GSAT0215MEO - Near-Circular12 Dec, 2017
GSAT0216MEO - Near-Circular12 Dec, 2017
GSAT0217MEO - Near-Circular12 Dec, 2017
GSAT0218MEO - Near-Circular12 Dec, 2017

glonass

Satellite NameOrbit Date
Kosmos 2569--07 Aug, 2023
Kosmos 2564--28 Nov, 2022
Kosmos 2559--10 Oct, 2022
Kosmos 2557--07 Jul, 2022
Kosmos 2547--25 Oct, 2020
Kosmos 2545--16 Mar, 2020
Kosmos 2544--11 Dec, 2019
Kosmos 2534--27 May, 2019
Kosmos 2529--03 Nov, 2018
Kosmos 2527--16 Jun, 2018

gps

Satellite NameOrbit Date
Navstar 82Medium Earth Orbit19 Jan, 2023
Navstar 81Medium Earth Orbit17 Jun, 2021
Navstar 78Medium Earth Orbit22 Aug, 2019
Navstar 77Medium Earth Orbit23 Dec, 2018
Navstar 76Medium Earth Orbit05 Feb, 2016
Navstar 75Medium Earth Orbit31 Oct, 2015
Navstar 74Medium Earth Orbit15 Jul, 2015
Navstar 73Medium Earth Orbit25 Mar, 2015
Navstar 72Medium Earth Orbit29 Oct, 2014
Navstar 71Medium Earth Orbit02 Aug, 2014

irnss

Satellite NameOrbit Date
NVS-01Geostationary Orbit (GEO)29 May, 2023
IRNSS-1IInclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO)12 Apr, 2018
IRNSS-1HSub Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (Sub-GTO)31 Aug, 2017
IRNSS-1GGeostationary Orbit (GEO)28 Apr, 2016
IRNSS-1FGeostationary Orbit (GEO)10 Mar, 2016
IRNSS-1EGeosynchronous Orbit (IGSO)20 Jan, 2016
IRNSS-1DInclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO)28 Mar, 2015
IRNSS-1CGeostationary Orbit (GEO)16 Oct, 2014
IRNSS-1BInclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO)04 Apr, 2014
IRNSS-1AInclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO)01 Jul, 2013